INTRO. CHRONICLES. SOCIETIES. PARISH. VILLAGE. CHURCH. PEOPLE.

A History of YALDING, Kent, England

ROSE COTTAGE on The Green.

 

A Medieval yeoman hall house. Wealden house with formerly open 2-bay hall plan; the walls are jettied at end as well as front. Evidence for normal service plan arrangement of central hall and upper floors at each end. Site of upper-end stairs uncertain because joisting is concealed: they could have lain outside main range, and have been reached through a doorway in rear wall of hall beside dais partition, where, immediately adjacent to closed truss, is a post and a bracket or half doorhead.

Almost central to the building is an large Cruck beam almost a half metre in width, that dominates the stairs of the left hand cottage.

Elaboration of first floor chambers occurred in Wealden and end jetty houses. One feature that indicated the importance of the chamber is the presence of small first-floor doorways which are thought to have led to projecting latrines, called garderobes.

The projections do not survive, but the doorways themselves and evidence for platforms and projecting chutes have been found, as at Rose Cottage, with the inner doorway shown on the right photo. A similar feature is found in Downs Farm House.

 

On the 1841 Tithe Map cottage was owned by Wellenhall College Trustees. At which time tenants were  1. Elizabeth Jones.

and 2. Richard Roff.

In 1841 Richard a ‘carrier’, was 20 living with Susanah (possibly his mother) and sister Frances aged 25.

His mother died in 1842, aged 62, buried on 13th August. On 1851 census Richard was still unmarried, with sister Frances and her illegitimate daughter Susana aged 2. Richard died in 1851 and was buried on 26th Sept aged 33.

Elizabeth Jones in 1841 was aged 61 and living with son Thomas aged 15. Elizabeth’s husband William had died in 1838 and was buried on 28th January aged 62. She died in 1845 and was buried on 17th Jan aged 65. By the next census of 1851 Thomas had moved out of the village.

 

Rose Cottage had been a doctors, surgery maybe just after first world war, used by Drs. Southwell-Sander, and A Campbell Black.